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Statistical References

  1. Tjaden, P., & Thoennes, N. (2006). Extent, nature, and consequences of rape victimization: Findings from the National Violence Against Women Survey. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice.
  2. Basile, K. (2011). National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey 2010 summary report. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention.
  3. U.S. Department of Justice, National Crime Victimization Survey. 2009-2013.
  4. Forge. Transgender Rates of Violence. October 2012.
  5. Fisher, B., & Cullen, F. (2000). The sexual victimization of college women. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice.
  6. The 1 in 6 Statistic. Retrieved February 6, 2015, from https://1in6.org/the-1-in-6-statistic/
  7. Krebs, C. (2007). The campus sexual assault (CSA) study final report : Performance period : January 2005 through December 2007 / prepared for National Institute of Justice by Christopher B. Krebs [et al...]. Washington, D.C.: National Institute of Justice.
  8. Dube, S., et al. (2005). Long-Term Consequences of Childhood Sexual Abuse by Gender of Victim. American Journal Of Preventive Medicine, 28(5), 430-438. 
  9. U.S. Department of Justice, Felony Defendants in Large Urban Counties: 2009.
  10. Abbey, A., McAuslan, P., and Ross, L. T. (1998). Sexual assault perpetration by college men: The role of alcohol, misperception of sexual intent, and sexual beliefs and experiences. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology (17).
  11. Lisak, D., and Miller, P. M. (2002). Repeat rape and multiple offending among undetected rapists. Violence and Victims (17, 1). 
  12.  Consequences of Sexual Violence. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2016, June 22) Retrieved September 23, 2016 from http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/sexualviolence/index.html 
  13.  Effects of Sexual Violence. (2016). Retrieved September 23, 2016 from https://www.rainn.org/effects-sexual-violence

  14. Bloom, S. (2003). Understanding the Impact of Sexual Assault. Sexual Assault: Victimization Across the Lifespan. Maryland Hights, Missouri: GW Medical Publishing.    
  15. Marx, B. et al. (2008). Tonic Immobility as an Evolved Predator Defense: Implications for Sexual Assault Survivors. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice 15(1). 
  16.  Effects of Sexual Violence. Rape Victim Advocacy. (2016). Retrieved September 23, 2016 from http://www.rapevictimadvocates.org/what-you-need-to-know/effects-of-sexual-violence/
  17. Krebs, C., Lindquist, C., Berzofsky, M., Shook-Sa, B., Peterson, K., Planty, M., ... Stroop, J. (2016). Campus climate survey validation study. Final technical report. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice. Click here for PDF.
  18. D.S. Riggs, T. Murdock, W. Walsh, A prospective examination of post-traumatic stress disorder in rape victims. Journal of Traumatic Stress 455-475 (1992).
  19. J. R. T. Davidson & E. B. Foa (Eds.) Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: DSM-IV and Beyond. American Psychiatric Press: Washington, DC. (pp. 23-36).
  20. DG Kilpatrick, CN Edumuds, AK Seymour. Rape in America: A Report to the Nation. Arlington, VA: National Victim Center and Medical University of South Carolina (1992).
  21. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Socio-emotional Impact of Violent Crime (2014).
  22. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Female Victims of Sexual Violence, 1994-2010 (2013).
  23. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, 2013 (2014).